Tag Archives: Photography

Radical Landscapes Exhibition, Tate Liverpool Video

Radical Landscapes Exhibition, Tate Liverpool Activism, trespass, and the climate emergency. Take a fresh look at the British Landscape and the art it inspires. From rural raves in Castlemorton to anti-nuclear protests at Greenham Common, this exhibition presents a radical … Continue reading

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RADICAL LANDSCAPES

RADICAL LANDSCAPES – TATE LIVERPOOL EXHIBITION 5 MAY – 4 SEPTEMBER 2022 Official View © The estate of Claude Cahun Activism, trespass, and the climate emergency. Take a fresh look at the British Landscape and the art it inspires From … Continue reading

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The dying art of the photographic darkroom – video

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/video/2011/jan/14/photographing-death-darkroom-video

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One Eye on the Road Slideshow

One Eye on the Road including ….. Free party Clubbing Free Festivals Stonehenge Beanfield Travellers Protest / CJA Reclaim the Streets …… and so on onwards ! Alan Lodge :: Photographer http://alanlodge.co.uk Lightroom Created MP4. Video resolution : 1920 x … Continue reading

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A Rough Guide to Filming Police Stop and Search

A Rough Guide to Filming Police Stop and Search NetPol https://netpol.org/resources/filming-the-police If you have a smartphone that includes a good quality photo and video camera then you will be able to film the actions of the police during a stop-and-search, if you … Continue reading

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Nottingham Centre for Photography and Social Engagement

Nottingham Centre for Photography and Social EngagementPhoto ParlourUnit 8, 18 Queensbridge Road,Nottingham,NG2 1NB Every last Wednesday of the month at 6pm

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DiY 30 years. A photographic Exhibition

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Photo crit session at the Photo-Parlour

A bit of a photo crit session at the Photo-Parlour

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Nottingham Centre for Photography and Social Engagement

I regularly go to a photography group here in Nottingham.They / we meet on the last Wednesday of every month at The Photo Parlour … so next one will be Wednesday 23rd Feb at 6pm The Nottingham Photo Social is … Continue reading

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British photography

I get a mention with Peter Gardner in this academic piece on British Photography under “The 1970s and 80s: the political turn” …. nice British photography refers to the tradition of photographic work undertaken by committed photographers and photographic artists in the British Isles. This includes those notable photographers from Europe who have made their home in Britain and contributed so strongly to the nation’s photographic tradition, such as Oscar Rejlander, Bill Brandt, Hugo van Wadenoyen, Ida Kar, Anya Teixeira and Sirkka-Liisa Konttinen. The 1800s: invention and popularisation Many technical innovations in photography were undertaken in Britain during the 19th century, notably by William Fox Talbot and Frederick Scott Archer. Early aesthetic breakthroughs were made by Lewis Carroll, Hill & Adamson, Julia Margaret Cameron and the Pre-Raphaelite photographers, and the “father of art photography” Oscar Gustave Rejlander. Travelling photography under adverse conditions was pioneered by war photographer Roger Fenton, and brought to a high level in England by Francis Frith and others. There were a number of local photographic societies scattered throughout Britain, often holding large annual public exhibitions; yet photography was mostly deemed at that time to be a science and a ‘useful craft’, and attempts at making a fine art photography almost always followed the conventions of paintings or theatre tableaux. There were also early earnest attempts at “trick photography”: notably of spiritualist apparitions and ghosts. Studio and travelling photographers had flourished in the Victorian and Edwardian eras, but the developing technology eventually allowed the mass-market commercialisation of cameras. With the introduction of the Box Brownie, casual snapshot photography became an accepted feature of British middle-class life from around 1905. =1845–1945: a century of anthropological documentary= British photography has long had a fascination with recording, ‘in situ’, the lives and traditions of the working class in Britain. This can be traced back to Hill & Adamson‘s 1840s records of the fishermen of Newhaven, John Thomson‘s photography for the famous book “Street Life in London” (1876), the street urchin photography of Dr. Barnardo‘s charity campaigns, Peter Henry Emerson’s 1880s pictures of rural life in the East Anglian fenlands, and Sir Benjamin Stone‘s surreal pictures of English folkloric traditions. This Victorian tradition was forgotten once modernism began to flourish from around 1905, but it appeared again in the “documentary” (a word coined in the 1920s by John Grierson) movement of the early and mid 20th century in activities such as Mass Observation, the photography of Humphrey Spender, and the associated early surrealist movement. Documentary pictures of the working people of Britain were later commercialised and popularised by the mass-circulation “picture magazines” of 1930s and 1940s such as “Picture Post”. The “Post” and similar magazines provided a living for notable photographers such as Bill Brandt and Bert Hardy. Also very notable is George Rodger’s London work for the US magazine “Life.” These large-format picture magazines served covertly as a “education in what a good photograph should look like” for their readers, something that was otherwise totally lacking. The British documentary movement contributed strongly to the poetic nature of some wartime early home front propaganda, such as Humphrey Jennings’ approach to film. 1945–1965: the post-war lull After the end of the war, photography in Britain was at a very low ebb. Due to post-war shortages and rationing it was not until about 1954 that it became easy to buy photographic equipment and consumables. As new cameras began to appear, there was debate over the ability to take ‘good’ pictures using old pre-war cameras. This argument was famously answered by “Picture Post” photographer Bert Hardy, who went to the seaside with a simple old Box Brownie camera and came back with some of the most memorable images of England in the mid 1950s. The pre-war picture magazines such as “Picture Post” declined rapidly in quality, and “Picture Post” eventually closed in 1957. Yet the desire to continue the photographic recording of everyday pleasures was evident in the 1950s Southam Street work of Roger Mayne, and also in the early 1960s in the work of Tony Ray-Jones (his “A Day Off”, 1974). Ray-Jones is known to have scoured London for the then uncollected photographs of Sir Benjamin Stone, one example of the piecemeal but growing awareness of the work of earlier British photographers. Ray-Jones’s extensive legacy in turning the mundane into the surreal can be seen in the 1990s work of contemporary photographers of everyday life and leisure, such as Homer Sykes, Tom Wood, Richard Billingham and Martin Parr. The 1960s: fashion and royalty The tradition of working-class and political photography runs in tandem with photography of the upper classes and British royalty, and the photography of the dandy culture of high fashion. Cecil Beaton was a fashion photographer from 1928 for “Vogue“, and later became the official photographer to the Royal Family. Likewise, Lord Snowdon, and Lord Lichfield continued the association of the British Royal family with photography, an association that had first begun when Queen Victoria and Prince Albert patronised the art photographers of their day, and was continued through the establishment of the Royal Photographic Society and the extensive photographic collection of the Victoria & Albert Museum. … Continue reading

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“Peak District in BW” on YouTube

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Cafe Royal Books pub: my Stonehenge Solstice Zine

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Travellers : Picture on my main website

I started taking pictures, at the end of the 70’s. I wanted to communicate something of what it was like to be a young rootless “Traveller”. Because I was one. Many looked at the various examples provided by gypsies here … Continue reading

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Capturing the Anthropocene: Changing Depictions of the Climate Crisis

Magnum photographers discuss alternative approaches to communicating climate change In this study of new photographic approaches to issues of climate change, Magnum photographers Sim Chi Yin, Cristina de Middel and Jonas Bendiksen speak to writer Georgina Collins about their practice. Alongside this, Toby Smith from … Continue reading

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Nottinghamshire Police : How we work with the media

Incidents How do we deal with photographers at incidents? The presence of a photographer or reporter at an incident doesn’t constitute any unlawful obstruction or interference and, where possible, our officers and staff should actively help you to do your … Continue reading

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10 Facts Every Street Photographer MUST KNOW

If you take photographs or film in public, you need to be aware of these essential facts. There is no general law that prohibits #photography/videography in public, but there are some essential caveats to be aware of. From photography in … Continue reading

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Can You Take Photographs In Public? Can You Film In Public? & s43 Terrorism Act 2000 Searches

In this video, I discuss whether you can take photographs or film in public. This is a brief explainer video of your rights when taking photographs or filming something (or someone) in public. There is no specific law that prevents … Continue reading

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Evolution of Photography

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The only way to prove that you have been clubbed by a policeman — photography him in the act

Astonishing cartoon for 1884. “The only way to prove that you have been clubbed by a policeman — photography him in the act.” 1884! The image appeared as part of a cartoon feature in the 31 December 1884 issue of … Continue reading

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NUJ in action . Nottingham

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